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environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make new york a greener city, has not yet proposed a major infrastructure change that might deal with rising water levels, for example. but he warned again today that citizens and policymakers need to take climate change predictions seriously. >> it's not the sort of thing that you can ever say for sure but the consequences of making a mistake in either direction are pretty severe and i think what we have to do is learn from this and protect our infrastructure to the extent possible. the bottom line is we've lost some people, we have to make sure we help their families and pray for them. we have to at the same time ensure that we go forward here and keep the city going. >> suarez: part of the growing problem: new york'
on there. it's a casual environment compared to some of the clubos polk street and having lived in the area i really like the environment of it. i think it's a great use of it, and i think it really does clean up a lot of what is going on down there, and i think he's doing the neighborhood a great service by toning it down because if you ever stepped there on a friday or saturday night it's scary and that's a nice quiet place and it does feel like your living room and i feel he's using it like it's proposed. you can try the wine before you buy a bottle and you don't have to worry about getting run over in the street so i am in favor of it. >> thank you. >> hi there. i am -- [inaudible]. i am a semi new resident of san francisco. let's been almost a year now but since i of living here on moving one of the first places i met a friend after work was at the poor house, and it was intimidating coming into the big city but i found this place it's very comfortable. i felt -- i mean -- i frequent there about twice a month and meet up with girlfriends and me and my friends feel comfortable ther
transportation fund for clean air revenues support. these are typically lead by the department of environment. one project that is flagged on your hand out for delivery issues is being led by the air district. this is the regional bike share project. i won't cover this. but it's a 12 to 24-month pilot program being done in the south bay select locations on the peninsula to test out bike sharing. i think the air district is experiencing the challenges we face with multiple sponsors. it's not going as fast as we can. we have dug into it a little bit. we are worried about cost controls for staff support cost and can report that the sfmta staff has been diligent in locating space. i think we are well positioned to get our bike sharing part of project out quickly. pedestrian projects, these are ones that we will have locations in each district. we have a larger list that i asked to be determined locations on curb ramps, what you see here, this is last year's allocation at 175 curb ramps. these have an independent of coordination with other projects. one of actions is approving dpw to kirkham. they
environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden gate bridge when 75 years ago that was going to be built and littl
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
slashed 25% and brutal in any environment and especially when other budgets hasn't been slashed as much, and understanding it might upset the apple cart so to speak, but i don't think we can be afraid of that in g we have to innovate. to some degree and maybe your department faces a challenge and labeled innovation capital of the world, however you want to label it and in the center of technology globally and i think we are expected to innovate. so what are some of the things that have to happen? what environments do you have to see -- let's say it's a centralization issue. what are issues that have to take place to have that dialogue happening? to me as i read through the report and i don't know about you president chiu, there seems to be an issue here. and progress is being made and that is great but is it fast enough? when i tell people i am on lotus notes for email it's a round laughter all along and what needs to take place. >> let me say two things about the conversation and let me put it out there how i perceive the comments and the reports and supervisor your comments. number
environment in iraq and assure more japanese firms can do business in the country. the president met iraq's prime minister through his first visit to the country and told the minister japanese companies are concerned about the risks of doing business in iraq. they include the sudden cancellation of contract. he asked iraq to promote a more business friendly environment. he stressed that the company will help iraq draft a legal framework to protect the rights of investors. next year will mark the tenth anniversary of the start of the iraq war. violence still rocks the country but iraq is becoming a major oil producer once again. the country's economic growth is expected to top 12% this year. japan self defense forces and u.s. military will hold their training exercise in waters off okinawa prefecture. they were to practice a land mag nufr, but it has forced military plan tires take a less direct approach. the drill is part of a large scale exercise that starts next week. commanders want to enhance the defense of southwestern islands. in italy they plan to hold a drill on an uninhabited isl
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
approximately 3 to 5 days of solid training to make sure that they are going to be working in a safe environment to learn what's going on. and most of the time that, the incidents in california will become mitigated. now, not to say that we certainly have that as an option. we have a fairly robust what we call fire crew program using cdcr inmate fire fighters. it is on our radar and it's something that we have as a contingency if we needed to do it. >> lieutenant colonel. >> yes, general, in the mou it does address the ground portion but the focus of effort is mainly on the aviation side but it is built in there for the ground side if necessary. >> i just want to say in 2008 we did activate hand crews to fight fires and we've identified soldiers throughout the state to respond if needed. they've got the tools that they need, the boots and all that cached and available. it's really just a matter of getting the call and being ready to go. >> i was going to end with general myat. i know we've trained soldiers to do that kind of thing. after the colorado fires just recently they did put a lot o
. it is people like me are getting resumes every day in this difficult economic environment. from high class standing people. 800 sats, they are looking for jobs. what you have to do is find a hook on your resume and show a high sense of community service. when i interview people, basically, the desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am introducing a legend. you know, the legends do something different. you know, these are some of the characteristics. you can get help from the university. if numbers don't speak to you, in other words, ben graham wrote a book called the intelligent investor in 1954. in the bookie prophesies that analysts evaluate management twice in the process. once through the numbers. when you look at a company, the company is growing and the return investment is widespread and profit margins and whatever -- the return to capital and whatever -- those are resulting from the efforts imagine. so you want to look at the financials. also, you want to look at the face-to-face and understand the business properly. if you don't like working with numbers
was someone who was actually crit tal to maintaining her health. but in a work environment, you need to make sure that the rules are clear. so that legislation, tried to create rules in a work environment for some information and they had protection and they could have breaks and they could have all of the protections that we have when we go to work. >> i think this we are a country that is founded on immigrants and i think that actually my ancestors, many people in the audience have been and they came from around the world and across the world. started in new lifes themselves. so, i just support completely the important role that immigrants have and i think that clearly, that there should be a path to citizenship and that there should be a great respect in many ways for all of the things that they do. >> state proposition, 35, asks if the definition of human trafficking should be expanded and the penalties for the traffickers be increased and be registered for sex offenders and training be provided for law enforcement officers. i am curious, what is your position on this? >> i support that.
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
rags. more blow back earlier but it's a news environment where they feel they can air whatever they want, people will be talk about sandy, ar by trait it after the election. >> this is the obama campaign's response to that ad. take a look at it. >> and now, after romney's false claim of jeep outsourcing to china, chrysler itself has refuted romney's lie. the truth, jeep is adding jobs in ohio. >> well, i mean, so do you have that response. you have -- i just think there are auto workers in ohio that know that their factory doors have remained open because of the choice the president made when he first took office. >> absolutely. i spent time recently in columbus which interestingly is a very bipartisan town, be democratic mayor, a bunch of republican city fathers spent money on infrastructure, supported the auto industry, they have a delegation to china to do deals like this one, to look for ways factory workers in columbus can sell to chinese. i think american workers are savvier about globalization and the opportunity it presents. >> that's not what the obama campaign thinks.
issues, in many cases i believe it's related to the environment. and some of the issues that they're exposed to. and, so, i think it's critical that we start to look at people who are struggling in a more compassionate way. so, since i've been supervisor, one of the organizations that -- community-based organizations that i've been very impressed by is the west side community services. i think that the -- (applause) >> there are a lot of communities, communities of color. they still have stigma attached to that name, mental health. so, it's really incredible that these individuals in this agency that's run currently by dr. jones who does pretty incredible work in the community in the western addition. (applause) >> that, you know, that they provide culturally competent services. and, so, the person that we're honoring today is it a willis. she's the program coordinator from west side community services in the western edition. tia wallace has been faithfully and compassionately working with children youth and their familiesates west side community services for 12 years. * as the pr
per day. bees live in highly organized societies that adapt rapidly to their environment, but they are under increasing threat from humans. this film director spent five years researching why bees were dying out. his film aims to wake people up to the problem. >> over the last six years, 30% of the population has died every year in europe, north america, and china. in parts of switzerland, the number is 70%. sometimes in america, it is between 50% and 70%, but on average, 30% every year. if it keeps going on like that, our valleys will soon look pretty sad. >> they're dying because of mites, bacteria, and parasites, a result of large-scale beekeeping. >> >> it is like wit -- >> it is like we are capitalists. we want to grow. total global domination. >> miller looks after 15,000 hives. he moves them between plantations of apple and -- allman and apple blossom, transporting them all across the u.s. -- plantations of almond and apple blossom. >> in reality, agriculture has to work in partnership with the bees, but when i approached agriculture department's in switzerland, th
by it in a safe environment and i believe it changes the lives of the students and changes of lives of usace artists. it's my hope in the year to become a second space like the strand will afford the students and the community to have gold work and engages the community the same way we were able to engage those students. i believe it will be a place where audience members will say their souls were fed from the stage and i urge the commission to share in this hope and enrich the life of the community so that we have grow and thrive together. >> good afternoon commissioners. i am eddy raymond and the vice president of ist local 16 in san francisco. i was an employee for act when i came into the union office. act employees hundreds of local 16 members over the course of one season. we represent the stage staff, and the permanent stage staff and the load for the theater as well as the scene shop and prop
with the high frequency trading environment. we're in an entirely different situation now in the last five years. even the locations. one of the very interesting parts of that is very mysterious about how could you have work if you had disruptions. >> tom: colocation is when a broker or trader puts their computer next to the exchange computer sometimes at the exchange. >> and finally, david, are you confident that the exchanges are ready to go tomorrow? >> i think they will be. if they say they are. this is a market situation. the exchanges know what's going on. they say they're ready. i'm confident they will be there. >> tom: you've been in that seat before. david ruder with us from the cme group, former chairman of the securities and exchange commission. >> tom: lincoln ellis is the chief investment officer with the strategic financial group. with us from chicago. do you think a cautious day of trading or a wild day of volatility? >> well, probably a bit of both. as you know, it's the month's end, and you have a fair amount of portfolio rebalancing that will happen tomorrow. that combineed wit
populated 7 by 7 urban environment like san francisco. we need to take advantage of public spaces wherever they are and they take all sorts of different shapes and forms and popos are certainly an important part of that mix. so i just wanted to express my thanks to president chiu for moving us forward and i move that we forward it with a positive recommendation to the board. i also adopt the amendment. >> i also really appreciate the increase of awareness of these public open spaces from redwood park in the shadow of the transamerica pyramid to the incedible roof sun terraces at the crocker galleria. i see no other comments. can we adopt these amendments without objection, colleagues? thank you. and on the ordinance itself, can we support this with a positive recommendation without objection? thank you. thank you. thank you, president chiu. miss miller, is there any other business before us. >> no, there are no further matters. >> great, meeting adjourned. thank you, everyone. (meeting adjourned). >> so again good morning everyone. i am ed risk. i am the transportation director in t
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
it comes to or shared values, marriage equality, environment. we are a becon to the rest of the world when it comes to our sports. i was proud a couple years ago to carry the legislation around america's cup bid to work with mayor lee to work with the warriors. i'm particularly pleased to work with supervisor ferrell and 49ers organization to make sure we win this bid. in my first couple weeks i put in a call to a young man named jed york. along with colleagues who were new in 2009 we asked you to consider sticking around in the city. while we may someday curse you for stop take our blessed team out of the city, we love the fact we are working together on this bid. we love that our 49er also continue to play great football down the street. we love the fact we still have hometown pride in the best football team in the franchise. thank you. looking forward to getting this done. [applause] >> i want to reiterate two points and open up to questions, if you have them for the folks up here. this will be the most shared super bowl super bowl bid ever. that is the key, hash tag super bowl and help
and various ethnic arms groups that have helped to create this environment of opium poppies been successfully grown again. for the last six years we have seen an increase in the cultivation area inside burma. yes, no underestimating the size of the challenge. a lot has changed in burma, but it will take a considered and concerted effort to tackle the problem. >> you are watching "bbc world news." headlines this hour, 40 people have been know to have died in the storm in the northeastern united states. tens of thousands of people have had to spend a second night in emergency shelters. you are familiar enough with these, of course. bananas are just about the most popular fruit in the world, but they could be replacing some staples in the parts of the world affected by climate change. the report commissioned by the un security council says that the production of these foods will decrease in many developing countries and that bananas might make a suitable replacement. joining me from edinburgh is an agricultural scientist with the climate change and food security research program. thank you very
with such an outrageous and dangerous view on our changing environment is the ranking member of the committee of environment and public works. maybe, maybe hurricane sandy will convince the senator and his fellow deniers that global warming is a very real threat but i wouldn't hold my breath. inhoff is actually in bed with big oil and big gas. the industry has given him more than half a million dollars. joining me to discuss the very real threat of global warming and the language of climate change is one of my favorites professor george, also the author of "the little blue book" the essential guide to thinking democratic. welcome back inside "the war room." >> always a pleasure to be here. >> jennifer: always a pleasure to have you. you wrote an article today for "the huffington post" and in that article, you said that global warming systemically caused hurricane sandy and you emphasized this issue of causation but systemic causation. explain what you meant. >> well, every language in the world can express what's called direct
it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest of the country. >> rebuttal from
environment and let's see if we can move outside the building space into the district space so to speak. are these competing visions or they complementary and can we imagine with all this doubling up of tech expertise here that we can begin to move some of the coproduce solutions quicker? >> echo production in this case is possible when and if something's happened. so dte in the city and key institutions like worsening in the university have to get together and say we want transparent the run energy consumption are building. was it going to take to have a dashboard that you and i can access on your smartphone or kids can access in their schoolrooms are parents and home double tell them which of the schools of the city school district are cleaner and greener and smarter than others. something that would require collaboration, that would have been utility to share the data. a lot of cities are now doing this to really change the game because now i have access to knowledge that will then tell me which school is least efficient and i'm going to focus on why that's inefficient. is it not whe
, in an environment which we can't afford to tank the economy, they are implying something that's fundamentally false, given what thengve told us. president obama is telling us how he's going to get some extra revenue by tax increases. but he's not going to get enough that way.t and he hasn't specified the spending cuts. and governor romney's numbers don't work out either. so you've got both implying that my plan is sufficient, when in fact neither is sufficient. and that's the problem. when they translate that into governance, if they just do . exactly what they promised they're going do, we are in a real crisis. and long term, our country's got serious and unresolved problems. >> the voter out there only has a choice, therefore, betw tn two insufficient possibilities.n >> b they t know that governor romney will cut more and obama will tax more.th that's a certain inference. >> on your point, i was surprised that when paul ryan said what he did to joe biden that, you know, "we can work together." and when romney runs, romney has a new ad out sayinge can work better with congress than obama has, tha
they weren't going to act on. >> it is interesting the politics in a tough economic environment, the first thing that goes is the environment. it just is, fair or unfair. >> the house of representatives under democratic control was able to pass that cap in trade legislation. look no further than missouri or virginia where you had democratic senators who had big coal industries who were probably a little scared of actually going on legislation like that. >> we're going to take a break. when we come back, we're going to talk a little bit about cars. anyway, trivia time. we asked the last republican elected from new jersey. the answer, clifford p. case. he was first elected to the senate in 1954 and he served until new jersey republicans rejected him for a fifth term in the primary. the state hasn't elected a republican senator yesterday and chris christie was the first republican to get over 50% in over 20 years when he won. we'll be right back. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole gra
. >> let's talk about how you got to 98.6 in an environment where everyone is still worried about retail. that means you're still signing people up. are these companies that formerly decided they didn't embrace the outlet and now are, or is this just more of the same, more under armor? more of a higher end guidance, more j. crew? >> people love the outlet. people love the bargain. they demand bargains in today's environment. everybody that manufactures almost anything today has an outlet distribution channel as part of their corporate strategy long-term. you mention under armor, they're great partners. but they've only been in business less than ten years. they've been public seven years. part of our skill set is identifying tenants of the future. which we want. we don't want tenants of the past. >> the ones that have been obsoleted by amazon do not have -- they just never went outlet. >> they did not. our products are basically apparel and footwear, sizes, colors. we do not sell computer hardware, books, things that are easily bought on the internet where you can get the best price on a
to the department of the environment to look at neighborhood issue in district 11 that is something that has been challenging for four years as a supervisor. in my district we have many oversized vehicles. a lot of them are scattered throughout the neighborhood from pares and brazil to munich and moscow. okly we put signs up all over the neighborhood we would never be able to address the issue. these oversized vehicles are actually scavengers. people use the cars to collect a lot of refuse that they recycle. a lot of it is actually material that could go in the dump, but it's actually taken out and sorted for other materials that can be othersed. -- used. what it does is create a huge blight in my neighborhood. some of the grime is left behind by some of the material that's recycled and it's an environmental issue. it's also a small business issue. it's a small business issue because there are many people who actually survive in san francisco, actually scavaging for material. and it's not people going through bins, but actually people finding trash all over the city and using that to make a livin
in a non-crisis environment so that when they have to do it anywhere in the world, they've got one extra training day. that's the way we look at it, it's all one extra training day. you add all that up, we have a lot better chance when we need it. with that, i'm going to bring up dejon and take over the panel and i'll talk to you shortly. >> thank you, rob. the panelists we have represent a broad group of participants, some of them participated themselves and some of them had individuals in their organizations participate. and i want them to start with an introduction of who they are, a little bit about their own background, so you understand the lens they were looking through when they were providing some of their answers today. starting with our 3 panelists that were part of our command and control exercise then we'll hear from our 3 panelists that were in our communications drill. >> lieutenant commander mike kress, operations officer at naval beach group 1, i was a coach during the exercise. we supported the exercise with 3 subject matter experts from amphibious construction batt
in that environment and how we can work out those gaps. >> yeah, i would agree. i think my take away would be that we should exercise together, small table tops initially and we can always develop larger ones, to really understand the capabilities and further plan and also how integration would work during a big disaster. >> so first i would tell my boss, major general steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical personnel in military and civilian hospitals and many other opt
presenting as well as the department of the environment about possible ways that we can better reach out about the program. and that's it, thank you. >> thank you very much. any questions from members of the commission? thank you. mr. dick allen. >> i'm sorry, i actually do have a comment on that. i believe we are in receipt of one of the cca stakeholders who was interested in participating and felt there wasn't adequate notice that was going to be agendized on your agenda. so i would encourage you to make sure especially all of those gripes that worked on cca, when you do talk about that issue, that you make effort to invite them so that they can hear about what you come up with at your committee. >>> absolutely, absolutely. >> thank you. >>> i think we got the letter as we were setting the agenda. but since we now have plenty of time frame, we should be able to invite anyone and everyone who might want to come. >> that sounds good, thank you. >>> thanks. >> thank you, mr. jones. mr. allen. >>> my name is dick allen. i've been a roller at lake merced for the past 20 years and i was co-c
back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the people at jpmorgan chase. these are real jobs, real families being put back to work. >> fill free to offer your opinion. >> 18,000 additional individuals who have dropped out of the work force, people who have taken part-time jobs, we can argue back and forth about the numbers but those people go to the polls and i will make a decision based on their own personal experience. >> >> you cited the number of people w
thinking about growth we need to think about the animals and the environment and the ecology as well. >> all right. mr. lagos. >> yes. one of the reasons i moved to san francisco 35 years ago was because there was not a large population here. i moved from los angeles and it's grown 50,000 people in those years. i don't want to see it grow further per se and i'm not a fan of developing more housing but to answer the question if we add more housing i would say loosen up the rules to allow homeowners to create inlaw apartments and that way you open up unit availability at some level for additional housing. other than that i would be opposed to any new construction of any major land use of development for housing including the three major projects in the pipeline. >> mr. rogers. >> if there is going to be development it could be in the trans bays terminal that is truly close to rapid transit. walking distance to bart. walking distance to the train that heads down south. this would be an ideal place for a development to occur. a place like park merced where you have 17,000 people w
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the marke he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn'rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. liz: how many of you bought airborne to take because you have a coal? the company that makes it is called shift nutritional international. look at these shares. stopping move to the upside of 45%. it looks like bear health care is going to be buying it. there you go. shift network up nearly 46% at the moment. this was a $22 stock earlier todaying and now, a 33.83 stock. a big move on that one. there's a lot of commerce happening despite all the storm and the angst going on, but it appears with just a few seconding left before the end of trade today that the markets are moving, fu
an understanding of an environment -- if you come back to - 0, about focusing on the customer and producing products that our customers really want and value, it is an understanding in a sense of the economics, distribution, vehicles, the supply base. i talk about the 12,000 jobs at ford, the jobs in the supply base and related engineering activities. i really just keep coming back to the market itself, the opportunity to put great vehicles out there, to focus on the things people really want, and to talk back to the high- tech jobs. historically, our industry, particularly the domestic manufacturers in the detroit area -- for now, competitors of rust belt. we made a commitment to engineer the highest quality vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in every sector the we compete in every market around the world. if you come back to some of the investments i mentioned earlier, a very large percentage of those investments have been in very high-technology power trends, weather they are hybrid vehicles, battery, electronic vehicles. we now have six electrified the nichols we will be selling
that kind of individualized attention may be harder to get now in the environment that states are moving to. states really there in the degree to which the shift to automated method is being pushed versus just being offered as an additional opportunity for accessing the program. and so i think it's important to remember that not all low income population of access to the technology, to the internet or the same ability to be able to use it. we hear about prepaid cell phone plans being a problem for people when have to wait on hold for a long time or participate in an interview over the telephone. many states are closing local offices, which would mean that people live in remote areas have to drive farther if they do want to be able to see somebody and talk to things within. and are increased, or still have reports of uncommon benefits, lost paperwork, long wait times in person and on the telephone. and auto closure, which is sort of the way fancy way of saying that the state had the cheerios for people but didn't have the time to act on it so the computer automatically will close cases. and
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